Friday, May 19, 2017

Auto-immune support pet?! Wah?!

Since I'm trying to keep my readers in the loop about my medical diagnosis, it has taken another turn, not much of a huge turn, but a turn. I'll try to explain as well as I can, because the last time I left my readers, I was told from the rheumatologist, that I was discharged from his services because he said I had a false positive.

Last week, after my appointment I started feeling extremely achy, and my back hurt which was something I've felt before, but chalked it up to nothing like a bug I couldn't shake, because my lymph nodes would get sore. But because I was losing sleep over it, I made an appointment with my doctor. I trusted my gut instincts and knew something wasn't right.

As soon as I went to my appointment she told me she wasn't happy with me being discharged from the rheumatologist's service and told me that she wanted me to see the university doctors, instead, because they actually take the time to listen.

#Infographic: 4 Most Common Triggers of a Lupus Flare. (If you live with lupus, join the social network for people like you: MyLupusTeam.com) #lupus #lupusflare:
Photo source: MyLupus.com
(which I am also a part of feel free to add me KateQuintzel)


She then gave me a prescription for Prednisone to stop inflammation, then told me she's not diagnosing me with anything yet but is treating me as if I have something auto-immune. Because that's all she could really do until I saw the doctors at the university. She also made an appointment with a neurologist in the mean time.

She then gave me a prescription for Prednisone to stop inflammation, then told me she's not diagnosing me with anything yet but is treating me as if I have something auto-immune. Because that's all she could really do until I saw the doctors at the university. She also made an appointment with a neurologist in the mean time.

For a quick medical run down of what an autoimmune disorder is. Please excuse the fact that I suck at describing anything medical so if something doesn't make sense I'll try to clarify it, if there are any questions.

Easily put, in someone with an autoimmune disorder our body attacks itself. With lupus, it's usually issues and RA joints. Someone, of course, can have more than one autoimmune disorder. With autoimmune disorders their pain, inflammation, tiredness, and a whole weird list of symptoms, such as dry mouth, mouth sores, rashes. Not everyone has the same exact symptoms either, but all the autoimmune disorders have a list of criteria that someone must meet to be considered positive.

All most all autoimmune disorders do have one thing in common, and that's the positive ANA. A normal person's ANA should be below 1:40. Mine is 1:160 which isn't high, but it's not exactly low either. Some people's ANA is in the 1000's, and the pattern has a lot to do with things as well. My pattern was homogenous. Which is usually common with lupus. So I'm back to the old drawing board again and hope to get more help this time.

Of course, this does bring me to one good thing about myself. I have been listening to myself a bit better. People do need to listen to their bodies and trust their gut. As soon as I was discharged from the rheumatologist, I was sure I had something wrong with me, and I wasn't just some crazy nut job. So yes trust yourself. Since I knew my body I knew what to do.
Ignore the blur this is a sleeping Freya


Since I've been feeling run down, I have had Freya near me as much as possible, she comes in and lays on my back, or my stomach and purrs. She loves keeping an eye on me to make sure I'm okay, well that and she does come to tell me, and only me that she's hungry and that she can see the bottom of her bowl. It's nice to have a nice helpful kitten help me when I'm not feeling good.

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